Spring 2014 IAB & Research Review - Director / Speaker Biographies
March 5 - 6, 2014

Invited Speakers

Connie J. Chang-Hasnain, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
She received her B.S. from UC Davis, 1982, M.S. and Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, 1984, and 1987 respectively. She was a Member of Technical Staff at Bellcore from 1987 to 1992. From April 1992 to December 1995, she was Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. January 1996 she joined EECS at UC Berkeley. She is the director of CONSRT, a center of 10 professors across 6 universities with a research focus of nanostructured semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices.

Professor Chang-Hasnain has co-authored over 400 research papers in technical journals and conferences. She also holds more than 30 patents. Professor Chang-Hasnain was named a Presidential Faculty Fellow, a National Young Investigator, a Packard Fellow, a Sloan Research Fellow, and Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer of the Year by Eta Kappa Nu. She received the 1994 IEEE LEOS Distinguished Lecturer Award, the 2000 Curtis W. McGraw Research Award from the American Society of Engineering Education, the 2003 IEEE William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award, and the 2005 Gilbreth Lecturer Award from National Academy of Engineering. In 2009, she was named a Guggenheim Fellow. Professor Chang-Hasnain is a Fellow of the IEEE, OSA and IEE, and an Associate Editor for the IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technologies. She has been elected an Honorary Member of A.F. Ioffe Institute in 2005

See also: http://light.eecs.berkeley.edu



Costas P. Grigoropoulos, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Costas P. Grigoropoulos received his Diploma Degrees in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (1978), and in Mechanical Engineering (1980) from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece. He holds a M.Sc. degree (1983), and a Ph.D. (1986), both in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University. He joined the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley as an Assistant Professor in 1990, after serving as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington from 1986-1990. He was promoted to Associate Professor in July 1993 and to Professor in Mechanical Engineering in July 1997. He also holds an appointment as a Faculty Staff Scientist with the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of LBNL. He has conducted research at the Xerox Mechanical Engineering Sciences Laboratory, the IBM Almaden Research Center and the Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, FORTH, Greece.
Grigoropoulosí current research interests are in micro/nano engineering, laser materials processing and micro/nano-machining, laser-based non-contact diagnostics for chemical analysis, change of phase transformations in semiconductors and electronic materials, laser-driven thin film crystal growth for applications in micro/nanoelectronic devices, laser-induced nanodeposition, microscale fuel cells, fabrication of flexible electronics and solar cells, catalytic micro-reactors, hydrogen storage, thermal management in micro-devices, transport diagnostics in MEMS, nanofluidic transport and laser interactions with biological materials.

See also: http://www.me.berkeley.edu/faculty/grigoropoulos/


John Heck, Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Intel Labs
John Heck is a staff scientist at Intel Corporation, where he is responsible for developing Intelís silicon photonic laser process and bringing it to manufacturing. He previously led MEMS processing and packaging development for RF switches, FBAR filters, and MEMS memory devices, a project for which he was an industrial affiliate at IMEC (Belgium). Dr. Heck received his PhD in applied physics from UC Berkeley in 2001, where he co-developed the SiGe MEMS process for integration with standard CMOS, a technology which recently became commercialized for timing devices. He holds more than 30 patents and has over 30 publications.



Mitchell Kline, Sensing Hardware Engineer, Nest
was born in Temple, TX in 1986. Mitchell received his BS from Texas A&M University in 2008 and his MS from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010. He is continuing to pursue a PhD at Berkeley under the advisement of Professor Bernhard E. Boser.

His research interests include sensor interface circuits, MEMS inertial sensors, signal processing, and controls. He has previously worked on power electronics---specifically capacitive power transfer for contactless charging and LED lighting applications. He has completed internships at National Instruments in Austin, TX in 2007 and Intrinsity in Bee Cave, TX in 2008.

See also: https://nest.com



Roya Maboudian, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
is professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She is currently serving as editor to the IEEE Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems (JMEMS), as associate editor to IEEE/SPIE Journal on Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS and MOEMS (JM3), and as advisory board member to ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (AMI).

Prof. Maboudian's research interest is in the surface/interface and materials science and engineering of micro/nanosystems, with applications in harsh-environment sensing, health and environmental monitoring, and energy technologies. Prof. Maboudian has coauthored over 250 papers in peer-reviewed archival journals. She is the recipient of several awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from the White House, NSF Young Investigator award, and the Beckman Young Investigator award.

Prof. Maboudian received her B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Physics from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

See also: http://cheme.berkeley.edu/people/faculty/maboudian



Eric Mounier, Senior Analyst, MEMS Devices & Technologies, Yole, Inc.
Dr. Eric Mounier received a PhD in microelectronics from the Grenoble Institute of Technology (INP), France. In 1998, he co-founded Yole Developpement, a market research firm, where he in charge of market analysis for MEMS & Sensors, visible and IR imagers, semiconductors, printed electronics and photonics. He is Chief Editor of Micronews and the Yole Developpement publications MEMS Trends, Power Dev', iLED, and 3D Packaging.
Dr. Mounier previously worked at CEA LETI R&D lab in Grenoble in the marketing department and he is also an expert at the Observatoire des Micro et NanoTechnologie (OMNT) in Gronoble. He has contributed to more than 150 marketing & technological analyses and 60 reports.

See also: http://www.yole.fr



Vladimir Stojanovic, Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Vladimir Stojanovic is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include design, modeling and optimization of integrated systems, from CMOS-based VLSI blocks and interfaces to system design with emerging devices like NEM relays and silicon-photonics. He is also interested in design and implementation of energy-efficient electrical and optical networks, and digital communication techniques in high-speed interfaces and high-speed mixed-signal IC design. Vladimir received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2005, and the Dipl. Ing. degree from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1998. He was also with Rambus, Inc., Los Altos, CA, from 2001 through 2004 and with MIT as Associate Professor from 2005-2013. He received the 2006 IBM Faculty Partnership Award, and the 2009 NSF CAREER Award as well as the 2008 ICCAD William J. McCalla, 2008 IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging, and 2010 ISSCC Jack Raper best paper awards. He was an IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society Distinguished Lecturer for the 2012-2013 term.

See also: http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=rsGmH38AAAAJ



Laura Waller, Assistant Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Assistant Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) department at UC Berkeley, running the Computational Imaging Lab. She was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Electrical Engineering and Lecturer of Physics at Princeton University from 2010-2012 and received B.S., M.Eng., and Ph.D. degrees in EECS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2004, 2005, and 2010, respectively.

See also: http://www.laurawaller.com



Eli Yablonovitch, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Director of the NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S), a multi-University Center based at Berkeley.
After a career in industry and in Universities, he is now Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at UC Berkeley, where he holds the James & Katherine Lau Chair in Engineering.
He contributed the 4n2 light-trapping factor to solar cells, which is used commercially in most solar panels world-wide. He introduced the benefit of strained quantum well lasers, an idea which is employed widely in most semiconductor lasers. He is regarded as a Father of the Photonic BandGap concept, and he coined the term "Photonic Crystal".
Prof. Yablonovitch is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the IEEE, and the American Physical Society. He was elected a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and as Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London. He has been awarded the Adolf Lomb Medal, the W. Streifer Scientific Achievement Award, the R.W. Wood Prize, the Julius Springer Prize, the IET Mountbatten Medal (UK), the IEEE Photonics Award, the Harvey Prize (Israel), and the Rank Prize (UK). He also has an honorary Ph.d. from the Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm Sweden, and from the Hong Kong Univ. of Sci. & Technology.

See also: http://optoelectronics.eecs.berkeley.edu


 
BSAC Directors
 
 

 
Bernhard E. Boser is a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center and the UC Berkeley Swarm Lab. His current research interests include; analog and digital circuit design and micromechanical sensors and actuators.

Prior to joining BSAC, Professor Boser conducted industrial research as Member of Technical Staff, AT&T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, NJ (1988-1991) where he worked on adaptive systems, hardware implementations for neural network applications- including special purpose integrated circuits, and digital signal processors-and simulation of neural networks on parallel processors. He was Editor in Chief of IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, from 2002-2004. Professor Boser has served on the program committees of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, the Transducers Conference, and the VLSI Symposium.

Professor Boser received a B.S. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) in 1984 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University (1985/1988).
See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~boser

  

 
David A. Horsley is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Vice Chair for Graduate Studies at the University of California, Davis and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center.

Prior to joining the faculty at UC Davis, Professor Horsley held research and development positions at Dicon Fiberoptics, Hewlett Packard Laboratories, and Onix Microsystems. His research interests include microfabricated sensors and actuators with applications in optical MEMS, communication, displays, and physical and biological sensors.

Professor Horsley is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award and the UC Davis College of Engineeringís Outstanding Junior Faculty Award.

Professor Horsley received B.S. and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, CA, in 1992, 1994, and 1998 respectively.
See also:  http://mae.ucdavis.edu/dahorsley

  

 
John M. Huggins Executive Director, Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, UC Berkeley (since September 2002). MS, Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota (1973); Stanford High Tech Executive Institute. Founder & CEO of TDK Systems Inc; VP, Advanced Development, Silicon Systems Inc; Telecom development manager, Intel Corporation. Guest Editor and Associate Editor, IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits; Technical Program Committee, International Solid State Circuits Conference 5 years. Chair, PCMCIA communications standards subcommittee. Five U.S. Patents. Research and professional interests: mixed signal CMOS integrated circuits, electronic communications, and telecommunications high tech business development.
See also:  http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/project/list_projects_by_director.php?PersonID=1086

  

 
Ali Javey is an associate professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory where he serves as the program leader of Electronic Materials (E-Mat). He is an associate editor of ACS Nano and the Bay Area PV Consortium (BAPVC) and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center.

Professor Javey's research interests encompass the fields of chemistry, materials science and electrical engineering. His work focuses on the integration of nanoscale electronic materials for various technological applications, including novel nanoelectronics, flexible circuits and sensors, and energy generation and harvesting. For his contributions to the field, he has received a number of awards, including the APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (2011); IEEE Nanotechnology Early Career Award (2010); Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (2010); Mohr Davidow Ventures Innovators Award (2010); National Academy of Sciences Award for Initiatives in Research (2009); Technology Review TR35 (2009); NSF Early CAREER Award (2008); U.S. Frontiers of Engineering by National Academy of Engineering (2008).

Professor Javey received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University in 2005, and served as a Junior Fellow of Harvard Society of Fellows from 2005 to 2006.
See also:  http://nano.eecs.berkeley.edu

  

 
Luke P. Lee is the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley, a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, and the Director of the Biomedical Institute of Global Healthcare Research & Technology (BIGHEART).

Professor Leeís current research interests are bionanoscience, nanomedicine for global healthcare and personalized medicine, and Bioinspired Photonics-Optofluidics-Electronics Technology and Science (BioPOETS) for green building with living skin. He was Chair Professor in Systems Nanobiology at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH, Zurich) and has more than ten years of industrial experience in integrated optoelectronics, Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), and biomagnetic assays.

Professor Lee is a is a 2010 Ho-Am Laureate and has authored and co-authored over 250 papers on bionanophotonics, microfluidics, single cell biology, quantitative biomedicine, molecular diagnostics, optofluidics, BioMEMS, biosensors, SQUIDs, SERS, and nanogap junction biosensor for label-free biomolecule detection.

Professor Lee received his B.A. in Biophysics and Ph.D. in Applied Science & Technology: Applied Physics (major) / Bioengineering (minor) from the University of California, Berkeley.
See also:  http://biopoems.berkeley.edu

  

 
Dorian Liepmann is a professor in the Departments of Bioengineering and Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley and Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center.

Professor Liepmann has been a faculty member for 21 years. He was Chair of the Dept. of Bioengineering from 2004 to 2010 and held the Lester John and Lynne Dewar Distinguished Professorship in Bioengineering from 2001 to 2005. His research interests include BioMEMS, microfluid dynamics, experimental biofluid dynamics, hemodynamics associated with valvular heart disease and other cardiac and arterial flows.

Prior to joining the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, Professor Liepmann had ten years of industrial research experience at the Jet Propulsion Labs and the Institute for Non-Linear Science at UC San Diego.

Professor Liepmann received his Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of California, San Diego in Applied Mechanics.
See also:  http://bioeng.berkeley.edu/people/cv?facultyid=3034; http://LiepmannLab.squarespace.com

  

 
Liwei Lin is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. His research interests are in micro/nano electromechanical systems, including design, modeling and fabrication of micro/nano structures, micro/nano sensors and micro/nano actuators.

Professor Lin worked with BEI Electronics from 1993 to 1994 in research and development of microsensors. From 1994 to 1996 he was an Associate Professor at the Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University. From 1996 to 1999 he was an Assistant Professor at the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Department at the University of Michigan.

Professor Lin is the recipient of the 1998 NSF Career Award for research in MEMS Packaging and the 1999 ASME Journal of Heat Transfer best paper award for his work on micro-scale bubble formation. He led the effort in establishing the MEMS division in ASME and is the founding Chairman of the Executive Committee and an ASME Fellow. He is a subject editor for IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, the North and South America Editor for Sensors and Actuators A Physical, and Associate Editor, ASME Journal of Micro- and Nano-Manufacturing. Furthermore, Professor Lin holds 15 US patents in the area of MEMS.

He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991 and 1993, respectively.
See also:  http://www.me.berkeley.edu/faculty/lin/index.html

  

 
Michel M. Maharbiz is an associate professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. His current research interests include building micro/nano interfaces to cells and organisms and exploring bio-derived fabrication methods.

Professor Maharbizís work on microbioreactor systems under Professor Roger T. Howe (EECS) and Professor Jay D. Keasling (ChemE) led to the foundation of Microreactor Technologies, Inc., which was acquired by Pall Corporation in 2009. From 2003 to 2007, he was an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is the co-founder of Tweedle Technologies and served as Vice President of Product Development at Quswami, Inc. from July 2010 to June 2011.

Professor Maharbiz was the recipient of a 2009 NSF Career Award for research into developing microfabricated interfaces for synthetic biology. In 2013 He received an Excellence in Engineering Education Award from National Instruments. He has been a GE Scholar and an Intel IMAP Fellow. His group is also known for developing the worldís first remotely radio-controlled cyborg beetles. This was named one of the top ten emerging technologies of 2009 by MITís Technology Review (TR10) and was in Time Magazineís Top 50 Inventions of 2009. Michelís long term goal is to understand developmental mechanisms as a way to engineer and fabricate machines.

Professor Maharbiz received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.
See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~maharbiz

  

 
Richard S. Muller is a professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and Co-Founding Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. He joined the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley in 1962 where his research focus was on the physics of integrated circuit devices.

Together with Dr. T.I. Kamins of Hewlett-Packard Company, Professor Muller published Device Electronics for Integrated Circuits in 1977. In the late 1970s he began research in the area now known as MEMS, and with R.M. White founded the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center in 1986.

He proposed and serves as Editor-in-Chief of IEEE JMEMS. A member of the US National Academy of Engineering and an IEEE Life Fellow, he received the career MEMS Award at TRANSDUCERS í97, as well as the IEEE Brunetti Award (1998 with R.T. Howe), a Fulbright Professorship, and a von Humboldt Research Award at TU Berlin in 1994. Other awards include the Berkeley Citation, the IEEE Millennium Medal, and the Renaissance Award from Stevens Institute of Technology. Professor Muller served as a Trustee of Stevens Institute of Technology from 1996 to 2005. In 2013, Professor Muller was a co-recipient of the IEEE/RSE/Wolfson, James Clerk Maxwell Award with Professor Richard White.

Professor Muller earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and physics from the California Institute of Technology.
See also:  http://bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/~muller

  

 
Clark T.-C. Nguyen is a professor of Electrical Engineering and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. His technical interests focus on microelectromechanical systems and include integrated vibrating micromechanical signal processors and sensors, merged circuit/micromechanical technologies, RF communication architectures and integrated circuit design and technology.

Previously, Professor Nguyen was a professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Michigan and a DARPA Program Manager in the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO). He managed many DARPA programs including Micro Power Generation (MPG), Chip-Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC), MEMS Exchange (MX), Harsh Environment Robust Micromechanical Technology (HERMiT), Micro Gas Analyzers (MGA), Radio Isotope Micropower Sources (RIMS), RF MEMS Improvement (RFMIP), Navigation-Grade Integrated Micro Gyroscope (NGIMG) and Micro Cryogenic Coolers (MCC).

Professor Nguyen and his students have garnered numerous Best Paper Awards at prestigious conferences including the 1998 and 2003 IEEE International Electron Devices Meetings, the 2004 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, the 2004 DARPA Tech Conference, and the 2004 IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference. In 2001, Professor Nguyen founded Discera, Inc., a company established to commercialize communication products based upon MEMS technology, with an initial focus on the vibrating micromechanical resonators pioneered by his research in prior years. He served as Vice President and Acting Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of Discera from 2001 to mid-2002.

Professor Nguyen received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989, 1991, and 1994, respectively.
See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ctnguyen

  

 
Kristofer S.J. Pister is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley and is a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. From 1992 to 1997 he was an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

He created the term "Smart Dust" and pioneered the development of ubiquitous networks of communication sensors, a concept that has since become a vital sector of technology R&D. During 2003 and 2004 he was on industrial leave as CEO and then CTO of Dust Networks, a company that he co-founded to commercialize low-power wireless sensor networks. In addition to wireless sensor networks, his research interests include MEMS-based microrobotics and low-power circuit design.

Professor Pister received a B.A. degree in applied physics from the University of California, San Diego (1982), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley (1989/1992).
See also:  http://wsn.eecs.berkeley.edu/index.php

  

 
Richard M. White is a professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and a Co-Founding Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. Current research interests include wireless microsensors and energy scavenging devices for use in electric power systems and a portable particulate matter monitor for measuring concentrations of airborne aerosols and diesel exhaust particulates.

Professor White conducted microwave device research at General Electric before joining the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, in 1962.

Professor White also holds numerous U.S. patents and has co-authored texts and reference books on Solar Cells (1983), Acoustic Wave Sensors (1997), and Electronics (2001). In addition to the 2003 Rayleigh Award of the IEEE for seminal contributions to surface acoustic wave technology, Professor White is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the IEEE and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is the recipient of many academic awards including the IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award (1986), U.C. Berkeley Chancellor's Professorship, and the 2003 U.C. Berkeley Community Service citation award. In 2013, Professor White was a co-recipient of the IEEE/RSE/Wolfson, James Clerk Maxwell Award with Professor Richard Muller.

Professor White received his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in Applied Physics in 1956.
See also:  http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/project/list_projects_by_director.php?PersonID=705

  

 
Ming C. Wu is Nortel Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Co-director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the Faculty Director of UC Berkeley Marvell Nanolab.

From 1988 to 1992, he was a Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. From 1992 to 2004, he was a professor in the Electrical Engineering department at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he also served as Vice Chair for Industrial Affiliate Program and Director of Nano-electronics Research Facility. He has been a faculty member at Berkeley since 2004.

His research interests include MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems), MOEMS, semiconductor optoelectronics, nanophotonics, and biophotonics. He has published 8 book chapters, over 200 journal papers and 300 conference papers. He is the holder of 22 U.S. patents. Professor Wu is a Fellow of IEEE and was a Packard Foundation Fellow (1992-1997). He received the 2007 Paul F. Forman Engineering Excellence Award from Optical Society of America.

Professor Wu received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1986 and 1988, respectively.

See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Faculty/Homepages/wu.html

BSAC Researcher Speakers
Plenary Speakers for the BSAC Research Review Session

Mehmet Akgul, BSAC Researcher
Mehmet Akgul (BS'07) received his B.S. degree in electrical and electronics engineering from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey as 2nd of his class in 2007. He is currently working towards his PhD degree at University of California, Berkeley with Prof. Clark Nguyen.
His research focuses on design, microfabrication, and testing of large scale micromechanical circuits using capacitively transduced resonators as the building block, with primary focus on RF-channel select filter banks capable of selecting individual narrow-band channels directly at RF frequencies for true cognitive radio applications. His work also extends into improving capacitive resonator performance by using high-Q resonator materials, such as polydiamond; and strengthening electromechanical coupling via capacitive gap scaling by using ALD deposited high-k dielectrics.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1188243070


Corsin Battaglia, BSAC Postdoctoral Researcher
Corsin BATTAGLIA obtained his PhD in physics from the University of Neuch‚tel, Switzerland in 2008 for his work on the structural and electronic properties of self-assembled atomic chains on silicon surfaces. He also worked at Hitachi, Japan and at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. In 2009, he joined EPFLís PV-Lab, Switzerland as a postdoc and project leader where he worked on advanced light management concepts for thin-film silicon solar cells ranging from the development of new substrates and electrode materials to the fabrication and characterization of state-of-the-art cells. Since 2012 he is at UC Berkeley, USA. His current research focuses on novel concepts for thin-film III-V solar cells on non-epitaxial substrates and the development of carrier selective contacts for silicon and III-V solar cells.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1346778086

Maysamreza Chamanzar, BSAC Postdoctoral Researcher
Maysam is a postdoctoral research associate working with Michel Maharbiz and Tim Blanche on developing next generation high density nano neural interfaces.

Maysam received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2012. His Ph.D. thesis was on developing novel hybrid plasmonic-photonic on-chip biochemical sensors. Maysam received his M.Sc. in Electrical Engineering majoring in Microsystems from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008. He has also received a M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering majoring in microwaves and optics from Sharif University in 2005. He received his B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering in 2003 from Tehran Polytechnique (AmirKabirUniversity). Maysam has published more than 25 Journal and conference papers. He is the recipient of the Sigma Xi best thesis award from Georgia Institute of Technology. He has received and has been nominated for a number of awards such as the SPIE research excellence award, GTRIC innovation award, OSA Emil Wolf best paper award, and Edison innovation award.

Maysamís current active research is on the design and implementation of next generation optoelectrical integrated neural interfaces to explore and control the brain activity.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1347039845

Daniel Drew, BSAC Researcher
Daniel received his B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Virginia Tech in 2013. His past research includes electromagnetic railgun development, polymer-metal nanoparticle compounds for energy efficient mechanical switching, and melt blown polymer nanofibers for filtration applications. He began his MS/PhD program at UC Berkeley in Fall 2013 with a MEMS concentration. Current research interests include microrobotics, electrohydrodynamic thrusters, nanomechanical switches, and wireless mesh networks. He is currently supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1378834799

Kisik Koh, BSAC Researcher
Kisik Koh received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, in 2007 and 2009 respectively. His Master's research was for patterning and transferring carbon nanotubes by using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and laser assisted transfer techniques for MEMS/NEMS applications. He is currently working toward a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering with exploring high frequency magnetic materials for on-chip RF inductors.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1198080684

Mo Li, BSAC Researcher
received his B.S. degree in Microelectronics from Peking University in 2011. He finished his undergraduate thesis in MEMS Lab at UC Davis as an exchange student. He joined MEMS Lab in the same year under the supervision of Prof. Horsley. He is currently pursuing his PhD at UC Davis.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1314395891

Yipeng Lu, BSAC Researcher
Yipeng Lu received the B.Sc. degree in Materials Science and Engineering from Jilin University, Changchun, China in 2007 and the M.Sc. degree in Microelectronics and Solid State Electronics from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China in 2010. He worked in HUAWEI until 2011 when he joined into UCD MEMSLab under the supervision of Prof. David A. Horsley. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. from Mechanical Engineering at UC Davis.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1314396137

Jacobo Paredes, BSAC Postdoctoral Researcher
Jacobo Paredes, PhD. was born in Pontevedra (Spain) in 1984. He received his MS in Mechanical Engineering from Tecnun, the School of Engineering at the University of Navarra, in 2007. In 2008 he obtained his MS in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Navarra. He worked at CEIT, Spain, where he carried out his PhD degree in Biomedical Engineering. Jacobo was also a lecturer at the School of Engineering at the University of Navarra in 2011 and 2012. His interests are focused on the design and fabrication of biosensors and bioMEMS for healthcare applications, micro total analysis systems, lab-on-a-chip devices, implantable devices, new diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, tissue engineering, etc. He is co-author of two patents in the field of biomedical instrumentation and a number of scientific and technical papers. Currently he is conducting a two-year post-doc research at the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley under the supervision of Prof. Dorian Liepmann.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1359153431

Shao Ning Pei, BSAC Researcher
Shao Ning Pei received his B.S.E. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2009, and his M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2011. He is currently working towards his Ph.D. degree.

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1250716799

Tristan O. Rocheleau, BSAC Postdoctoral Researcher
I received my Bachelors of Science in Physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara with high honors in 2005. In 2011, I received my Ph.D. in Physics from Cornell University for work on cooling mesoscopic mechanical resonators towards their quantum ground state. Currently, I am working with Clark T.-C. Nguyen in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at the University of California, Berkeley on a number of projects related to Radio-Frequency MicroElectroMechanical Systems (RF-MEMS).

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1294266474


Jun Ho Son, BSAC Postdoctoral Researcher
Ph.D. (2010), B.S. (2006), Materials Science and Engineering
Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH)

See also: /directory/zoom?PersonID=1327969022